Events

08/13/2019

Tragedy and Survival-19th-century Florida

7 - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church ,18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte FL 33948

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08/13/2019

Tragedy and Survival-19th-century Florida

Dr. Uzi Baram, a distinguished professor of anthropology at the New College in Sarasota will present on the heritage of the Black Seminole on the Gulf Coast before 1821. Archaeology is revealing the magnitude of Spanish " La Florida" as a haven of freedom from slavery. From the Apalachicola River in 1816 to the Manatee River in 1821, freedom-seeking people fought for their liberty by use of Florida rivers. Dr. Baram illustrates how research has changed the image of the people known as escaped slaves and how the research creates a new heritage tourism for this part of the Florida peninsula. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of this presentation, members of the Charlotte Harbor Anthropological Society will also attend and participate.

7 - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church ,18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte FL 33948

PRESENTER

Dr. Uzi Baram

Education:

M.A., Ph.D. University of Massachusetts at Amherst
B.A. State University of New York at Binghamton


Uzi Baram is an anthropologist who teaches a wide range of archaeology and cultural anthropology courses. As a New College professor, Professor Baram has moved his principal area of research from the eastern Mediterranean to the west coast of Florida. In the eastern Mediterranean he has studied the material culture, cultural landscapes, Western travel accounts, and social identities of the Ottoman Empire. Current research on the Middle East examines the intersection of archaeology and heritage tourism.

As a faculty member at New College, Professor Baram has created local programs in archaeology and heritage studies. For example, the public anthropology program Looking for Angola employs the dual lens of archaeology and ethnography to reveal a `history from below’ for an early nineteenth century maroon community in the context of the anthropological critiques of racism and the histories of southwestern Florida. As the founding director of the New College Public Archaeology Lab, Professor Baram has trained students in historic preservation, public outreach, and anthropological studies of the recent past.

Professor Baram has edited and contributed to A Historical Archaeology of the Ottoman Empire: Breaking New Ground (2000), Marketing Heritage: Archaeology and the Consumption of the Past (2004), and Between Art and Artifact: Approaches to Visual Representation in Historical Archaeology (2007) as well as many journal articles and research reports on historical archaeology, heritage, and the politics of the past.


2018 Value and Values in Heritage Tourism from the Grand Tour to the Experience Economy. In Relevance and Application of Cultural Heritage in Contemporary Society, edited by in Pei-Lin Yu, Chen Shen, George S. Smith, page 66-78. Routledge, New York.

2018 “Marketing Heritage.” In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology: Living Edition, edited by Claire Smith, Springer.

2017 The Many Histories by Phillippi Creek Final Report on Community Heritage Awareness and Management Program (CHAMP) at Phillippi Estate Park, 2014-16. Submitted to Sarasota County Historical Resources

2015  “Including Maroon History on the Florida Gulf Coast: Archaeology and the Struggle for Freedom on the Early 19th-Century Manatee River” In The Limits of Tyranny: Archaeological Perspectives on the Struggle against New World Slavery, edited by James A. Delle, pages 213-240. The University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.

 2014 “Radical Openness in Preserving Regional Heritage” Anthropology News 55(5-6):28-29  

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Events

09/10/2019

The Gamble Plantation-Changing Narratives

7pm - 8pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

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09/10/2019

The Gamble Plantation-Changing Narratives

We invite you to 

7pm - 8pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

Site Content

Diane Wallman

Dr. Wallman is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida in Tampa. She is a historical archaeologist who works on sites associated with Atlantic Slavery. As a zooarchaeologist, her research focuses on issues of human-environment dynamics during the colonial period in the Caribbean, Southeastern United States, and West Africa. 


HER RESEARCH INTERESTS INCLUDE

Historic Archaeology

Community Archaeology

Archaeology of the African Diaspora 

Atlantic Slavery

Environmental Archaeology

Human-Environment Interaction

Zooarchaeology

Diet and Foodways

Regions

Southeastern United States

Caribbean 

West Africa

EDUCATION

May 2014

University of South Carolina

Ph.D. Anthropology

May 2009

Washington State University

M.A. Anthropology

May 2003

Skidmore College

B.A. Anthropology with a Minor in Environmental Studies

TEACHING

Archaeology

Historical Archaeology 

Archaeological Theory 

Zooarchaeology

Caribbean Archaeology

Archaeology of the Anthropocene


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Events

10/10/2019

The Archaeology of the Rosewood Massacre

7pm - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

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10/10/2019

The Archaeology of the Rosewood Massacre

We invite you to listen to live bands play beautiful music in the park. Enjoy the sounds of Laureen Davis and the Kings, and enjoy wine tastings hosted by 5th Ave Wines and Spirits.

7pm - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

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Edward Gonzalez-Tennant

University professor and author of the book  The Rosewood Massacre, An Archaeology and History of Intersectional Violence, University of Florida Press.


The Rosewood Massacre was an attack on the predominantly African-American town of Rosewood, Florida, in 1923 by large groups of whites. The town was entirely destroyed by the end of the violence, and the residents were driven out permanently. The story was mostly forgotten until the 1980s, when it was revived and brought to public attention.

ROSEWOOD, FLORIDA     

Though it was originally settled in 1845 by both blacks and whites, black codes and Jim Crow laws in the years after the Civil War fostered segregation in Rosewood (and much of the South).

Employment was provided by pencil factories, but the cedar tree population soon became decimated and white families moved away in the 1890s and settled in the nearby town of Sumner.

By the 1920s, Rosewood’s population of about 200 was entirely made up of black citizens, except for one white family that ran the general store there.

FANNIE TAYLOR     

On January 1, 1923, in Sumner, Florida, 22-year-old Fannie Taylor was heard screaming by a neighbor. The neighbor found Taylor covered in bruises and claiming a black man had entered the house and assaulted her.

The incident was reported to Sheriff Robert Elias Walker, with Taylor specifying that she had not been raped.

Fannie Taylor’s husband, James Taylor, a foreman at the local mill, escalated the situation by gathering an angry mob of white citizens to hunt down the culprit. He also called for help from whites in neighboring counties, among them a group of about 500 Ku Klux Klan members who were in Gainesville for a rally. The white mobs prowled the area woods searching for any black man they might find.!

Law enforcement found out that a black prisoner named Jesse Hunter had escaped a chain gang, and immediately designated him a suspect. The mobs focused their searches on Hunter, convinced that he was being hidden by the black residents.


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Events

11/07/2019

When Cattle Was King- the origins of Charlotte County

7pm - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

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11/07/2019

When Cattle Was King- the origins of Charlotte County

Historian and author Ted Ehmann will present the true beginnings of the settlement of Charlotte Harbor and the creation of Charlotte County. After the Civil War, the cattle kings moved their homes near the cattle's free range areas east of Charlotte Harbor. They then began to build pens and loading docks, the largest at the tip of Punta Gorda, for decades, these cattle barons continued their fortunes shipping cattle from Charlotte Harbor to Havana, Cuba. They controlled the economic and political history. This colorful past will be presented in a wealth of historic photographs and art that tell the story. Today, Florida is still a major cattle supplier in the eastern United States.

7pm - 9pm

Wintergarden Presbyterian Church, 18305 Wintergarden Ave., Port Charlotte

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Ted Ehmann

Ted Ehmann was born in Trenton, New Jersey in 1949. The grandson of the late noted landscape painter M. Frank Ehmann, he took to fine art at an early age. After suffering through schooling during the Cold Way years, Ehmann went to the Philadelphia College of Art to study painting.

He dropped out of the college at the height of the Viet Nam War and taught himself graphic design and advertising. In 1898 he went blind in one eye from a rare eye disease. The long illness and sudden blindness had profound effects on him. He remarked to friends that he saw the world quite differently. In the next couple of years, he traveled extensively, connecting to nature and wilderness. He studied Bioregionalism as well as shamanism ( native healing) teaching and sharing his insights even as far as the Soviet Union.

In 1990 why applying to the College of New Jersey to finish his Bachelors of Arts, Ehmann was offered a teaching position in the art department and was the only person to teach at the college while studying as an undergraduate. In those years as an undergraduate he double majored in art and history. He applied and was rejected by Rutgers University Anthropology Graduate Department where his mentor, Robin Fox had created the anthropology department. He accepted a graduate assistantship at the College of New Jersey and earned his Masters in Teaching History in 1994. He continued to teach both the visuals arts and the histories until retiring to Florida in 2016.


Currently, Ehmann is president and founder of the Charlotte Harbor Anthropological  Society, Treasure of the Charlotte County Florida Historical Society / Charlotte County Historical Center Society. In April 2019, Ehmann with other organizations spearheaded the Charlotte County Centennial 2021 Committee. His book on the Prehistory of Charlotte County and South Florida, The People of the Great Circle, The Mound Builders in South Florida 800 B.C. -1700 will be available on Dec. 16, 2019 and his book Florida's Gray Gold, The Phosphate Mining Boom in the Deep South 1868 - 2018 available on March 1, 2020 both by Pineapple Press. Currently he is writing a book on the history of Charlotte County, To the Ends of he Earth, in time for the 2021 centennial.

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